Singing Mercy and Judgment

“I will sing of mercy and judgment: unto Thee, O LORD, will I sing.” Psalm 101:1 (KJV)

This a Psalm of David.  A man who knew of God’s mercy and judgment.  We ought to be thankful for His lovingkindness, and His chastisement of His own.  Our hearts filled with song, and singing to the One who alone is worthy of song and praise.

Of this verse and song, Spurgeon has written,

“I will sing of mercy and judgment.” He would extol both the love and the severity, the sweets and the bitters, which the Lord had mingled in his experience; he would admire the justice and the goodness of the Lord. Such a song would fitly lead up to godly resolutions as to his own conduct, for that which we admire in our superiors we naturally endeavour to imitate. Mercy and judgment would temper the administration of David, because he had adoringly perceived them in the dispensations of his God. Everything in God’s dealings with us may fittingly become the theme of song, and we have not viewed it aright until we feel we can sing about it. We ought as much to bless the Lord for the judgment with which he chastens our sin, as for the mercy with which he forgives it; there is as much love in the blows of his hand as in the kisses of his mouth. Upon a retrospect of their lives instructed saints scarcely know which to be most grateful for – the comforts which have cheered them, or the afflictions which have purged them. “Unto thee, O Lord, will I sing.” Jehovah shall have all our praise. The secondary agents of either the mercy or the judgment must hold a very subordinate place in our memory, and the Lord alone must be hymned by our heart. Our soul’s sole worship must be the lauding of the Lord. The Psalmist forsakes the minor key, which was soon to rule him in the one hundred and second Psalm, and resolves that, come what may, he will sing, and sing to the Lord too, whatever others might do.
from THE TREASURY OF DAVID

O, let us sing of the LORD’S mercy and judgment.  Let us sing.

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